While Australia burns under a changing climate, our mangroves die-off

By PhD student Yota Harada Climate driven mass die-back is causing significant changes in mangrove ecosystems. Numerous marine species, including crabs, prawns and fish, rely on mangroves for nurseries, refuges and food. Mangrove forests support global fisheries and the livelihood’s of people, but large-scale mortality of mangroves is anticipated due to climate change and associated […]

In the face of degradation: Planning framework can help safeguard Amazon wetlands

By Dr Vanessa Reis In the face of dramatic degradation of the Amazon ecosystems, a new conservation planning framework can help safeguard the floodplain wetlands. Floodplain wetlands are unique ecosystems often highly influenced by seasonal variation in their connection to rivers. They contribute to the Amazons high biodiversity and are used by the local people […]

The Great Isoscape: Using barnacles to retrace oceanic movements

By Dr Ryan Pearson Techniques for tracking marine animals and objects have long been evolving; gaining in accuracy and reliability. However, most techniques rely on accessing an animal prior to tracking and few techniques are capable of retracing historical movements. Along with conservation efforts for threatened species, marine tragedies (where vehicles disappear in the ocean) […]

EFFECTIVE ACTION NEEDS ACCESSIBLE SCIENCE

  By Dr Chris Brown Coastal wetlands are globally threatened. However, the plight of these habitats, like mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltmarshes, is not well recognised relative to other coastal ecosystems, such as coral reefs. This translates into funding shortfalls both for the science needed to address coastal wetland decline and for the protection and […]

From sharks in seagrass to manatees in mangroves, we’ve found large marine species in some surprising places

Michael Sievers, Griffith University; Rod Connolly, Griffith University, and Tom Rayner, Griffith University When we think of mangrove forests, seagrass meadows and saltmarshes, we don’t immediately think of shark habitats. But the first global review of links between large marine animals (megafauna) and coastal wetlands is challenging this view – and how we might respond […]

How robust is the evidence that human activities cause jellyfish blooms?

By Professor Kylie Pitt (Originally Published at: Griffith Sea Jellies Research Lab) Pitt KA, Lucas CH, Condon RH, Duarte CM, Stewart-Koster B (2018) Claims that anthropogenic stressors facilitate jellyfish blooms have been amplified beyond the available evidence: A systematic review.  Frontiers in Marine Science doi: 10.3389/fmars.2018.00451 Sea jellies have bloomed in the oceans for more than 500 million […]